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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. when we have to turn down customers because of decision by government to interfere and make a regulation that says that we have to go in and, you know, stop cars from delivering the type of service they need to get in, and you know, people right now, with bad transit you have to travel. you can't stop people at the doorway and the limousine service is very important for customers. melissa: no, absolutely. you heard tom kloza was on right before you. he was saying a lot of this has to do with panic. i'm out there on the street, the gas situation is not about panic. it is about cars literally running out of gas because there isn't any around. give me an anecdote. what is going on? >> it's true. cars are running out. driving around for miles and miles trying to find a gas station. literally having to pull over, because they can't drive anymore. we're having, literally 30% of our fleet down as of last night. this morning we're turning away customers. we're telling no, we can't provide service to you. it's a real problem. it's not just, it is not imaginary. it is real. melissa: f
told hurricane sandy is proof we need a powerful federal government, the fema to provide emergency management. the just makes sense. disaster across state lines who but the fed can help? the new york times declared a big star requires big government. very few politicians are skeptical. it is a relief to turn to ron paul. doctor, it is of myths that we need fema? >> i think so. it causes more harm than good. we handle plus a disasters 204 years before we had fema i have taken this position for a long time since the was first in office and i kept getting reelected because people were tired of fema. locked into insurance and it is a bureaucracy. they just takeover. john: across the fed line they have to have rolled? >> no. we should have real insurance. it causes many of the problems because they say you have to have insurance. they will noo sell it. that tells you it is too dangerous. soap rich people are subsidized by the poor people they have a good time the houses are washed away. john: before the storm the president held a press conference that the red cross. >> we are here becau
. we have the details. >>> a government aud slams half a billion dollars in stimulus for green jobs. i say our government dollars are wasted but of course there is somebody to disagree with me. >> bakthrough in video messaging hopes to be the next big thing. entrepreneur behind the game changing technology is here to explain. even when they say it's not it is always about money messa: so first let's take a look at the day's maet headlines. a rough-and-tumble week for stocks ending a on a quiet note. better than expected u.s. third quarter gdp data could knot offset worries about corporate earnings the dow eked out a gain of three points. good year was one of the biggest losers wi shares tumbling more than 10%. the tire-maker missed third quarter estimates driven by weakness in europe. one bright spot was expedia. shar soared 15%. they posted strong third quarter earnings fueled by a sharp rise in hotel bookings. >>> now to our top story. some people are calling it "frankenstorm". others call it a nor'easter-cane combination hurricane, nor'easter snowstorm or nightmare. if you live on t
create a perfect storm for stocks. we're going to explain that. >>> does our government now need a secretary of business? president obama thinks so. what about the business community? we're going to get reaction straight from business owners mouths. even when they say it's not, even in this storm, it's always about money melissa: so, starting off tonight, no doubt hurricane sandy will cost a lot of money. it is still going strong, headed right for western new york. let us get the latest on the path from weather.com meteorologist. bernie, what is it getting ready to hit now? >> it is off to the east of pittsburgh. as you mentioned melissa, it is moving northward, when you take a look at storm, look how large it is. it is covering the eastern half of the united states. there is moisture feeding in on the earn end of it from the tropics. that is why we still have so much rain talking about. heaviest rain thankfully east of i-95 corridor through western pennsylvania and back to northwest indiana with this rain. we're not seeing the devastating rain we saw yesterday. pockets of heavy
their power so. melissa: maybe it is something we have to commit to? utilities are regulated by the government and they're told how much they can charge their customers. they don't necessarily have the room for this kind of expense. maybe that is the problem with having regulated businesses. maybe we all have to suck it up as a community and pay the assessment and put these power lines underground? >> you know, really depends geographically i think. each individual community has to take that cost benefit analysis. if storm damage is something that, you know, people are paying a lot for, it may be a idea but there's, other problems with burying them underground. where, you know, they're harder to get to. so when you have some sort of issue like a tree root breaking a line or flooding taking out power, it is can be harder to fix. can take longer to fix. again there is tradeoffs for both systems. melissa: but empirically, power has to go down a lot less frequently when it is underground. have you studied frequency? seems completely predictable. a storm whips through new york state. you know exact
of coness. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know it. ...i propose savings for everyone! i'm talking hundreds here... and furthermore.. newcaster: breaking news. the gecko is demanding free pudding. and political parties that are actual parties! with cake! and presents! ah, that was good. too bad nobody could hear me. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. ♪ . melissa: so we just got word power is finally back in the east village in the lowe east side in new york city but looting and mayhem hit the streets over the last few days. there were even reports of the guard yen angels out protecting the streets. with me, with his stories is edward, chef and owner at eddie and wolf a local hot spot in manhattan's lower east side. thanks so much for joining us. what do you see over the past couple days? this is what a lot of people are worried about with tempers high and lights out in lower manhattan the darker side would prevail. >> well, like the lower east side and the east village, alp
claims will probably be sky-high from hurricane sandy. last year during hurricane irene the government's flood insurance reported back insured losses more than $1.3 billion. with me now is gene salvatore re. vice president of insurance information institute. thanks for coming on the show. do you think this will be an event of the same magnitude? >> it is hard to tell. there will be a lot of flooding. this is basically a big flood event in love of these areas. melissa: fema back as lot of insurance. there are private companies as well. how does it all get divided up? >> basically how it works if you have a home insurance policy you're not covered for flooding. so you need to get separate flood insurance. most people buy flood insurance from the national flood insurance program. some people can choose to get it from a few private insures companies. melissa: i feel like federal flood insurance encourages people to buy luxury homes in spots that are not safe or spots they wouldn't choose to live in otherwise. should the taxpayer be helping to make someone whole who has a 10 million dollar
that is the not the problem. they are held back by government regulation and too much debt and they blame in short for the president that we don't have a "v"-shaped recovery. >> i think there is element of that. deleveraging stopped about 20 months ago and consumer spending took off in the recovery and the recovery was strong in the beginning. so much we spent went abroad to china. we had currency imbalance. all that on imported oil. all that is lost purchasing power. my view this is not a typical business cycle. the u.s. economy is structurally broken and some of the things this administration has done made it worse. like the banking regulations in new york don't fix the banks. they make it impossible for them to bank. and so my feeling is that there is some arguments on both sides but i'm not very optimistic that if mr. obama's reelected much of this is going to get fixed. >> nariman, i give you the last word. do you agree with that? >> i have two disagreements. one that deleveraging continues if you look at things like household debt to disposable income numbers they keep going down. households
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)